TABERNANTHE IBOGA

TABERNANTHE IBOGA

FAMILY :: APOCYNACEAE

IBOGA: A tropical shrub with panicles of small white/yellow/pink flowers from the West African rain forests.

Iboga plant and flowers

The yellow roots contain a number of indole alkaloids, the most active of which is probably ibogaine, which is found in the highest concentration in the root-bark. The root material, bitter in taste, causes an anaesthetic sensation in the mouth as well as a systemic numbness of the skin.

The root bark is used as a magical plant in initiatory rights of secret cults such as the Bwiti of Western central Africa. Ibogaine, the chief alkaloid in this plant is a MAO inhibitor, has psychedelic properties, and in low doses is capable of producing aphrodisiac effects. Large doses can be fatal. Ibogaine is being researched as a cure for alcoholism. Illegal in the US.

IMAGE: Ibogaine HCl Crystal Under UV, courtesy of Marko Resinovic and the Sacrament of Transmission.

“The Catholic church is a beautiful theory for Sunday, the iboga on the contrary is the practice of everyday living. In church, they speak of God, with iboga, you live God” – Nengue Me Ndjoung Isidore, ecumenical Bwitist religious leader

MORE INFORMATION:

Video about Ibogaine Treatment:
TV KPIX News Broadcast about Ibogaine

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ACORUS CALAMUS

ACORUS CALAMUS

FAMILY :: ARACEAE
SWEET FLAG: From Central Asia, but now distributed throughout all Northern temperate and sub-tropical zones, this hardy, water-loving plant is slightly sedative (in Ayurvedic and Thai medicine), a stimulant (in American Indian medicine and the US Pharmacopœia), is used to stimulate the gastric and salivary glands universally. In larger doses, it is considered an aphrodisiac. And at 10 times the dose used by the Cree tribe as a stimulant, it has been reported to be hallucinogenic. Popular in herbal baths and formerly used as a beer and liqueur flavoring. Contains asarones which may be carcinogenic in large doses.

CROCUS SATIVUS

CROCUS SATIVUS

FAMILY :: IRIDACEAE
SAFFRON: A wonderful small plant that has been used and valued for over 1000 years. Medicinally, it is stomachic, antispasmodic and sedative. Once considered to be an aphrodisiac, probably because of these medicinal properties.

Saffron, the spice, is the orange stigmas of the purple flowers that appear for a short period in the fall. It takes about 60,000 stigmas to make a pound of spice. The taste is unique, though often herb companies will try to pass off the safflower as saffron because it has a similar color. Semi-hardy, growing best in sandy soil in full sun.

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http://www.saffron.biz/saffron.php